Fast & Furious Lessons For A Team
Fast & Furious Lessons For A Team

The Fast and Furious franchise has always fascinated me. Not only for its elaborate portrayal of what man and machine can do, but also for its hidden gems of insightful inspiration. I remembered fondly just how much I wanted to be the “Gaijin” as depicted in their “Tokyo Drift” installment. The thought of being an “outsider” in a world so familiar to you was just appealing in a raw way.

Anyway, I just caught the latest installment, FF6. Got home totally inspired to write this post, as there were crucial points to take note of. Especially in the areas of teamwork. So bear with me, as I present to you some of the finer details, I personally felt enlightening.

Furious Lesson #1: If You Are The Best At What You Do, Opportunities Will Always Arrive

The protagonists of the FF installments were last featured as runaway criminal with millions to spare, after their last heist. Some of them like Roman, were now living the jet setting life. But upon being given the opportunity to once again assemble as a team to take on one of the world’s most high tech criminals, none of the members missed out on that chance. The thrill of living out what they did best, was just too exciting to ignore. Thus Hobbs’s invitation was a testimony to the fact that they were indeed indispensable.

Furious Lesson #2: Loyalty Will Always Be The Strongest Glue That Binds A Team

When Hobbs decided to call upon Dominic for assistance, he must have known at the back of his mind that, assembling the team again was gonna be a formality. Knowing full well the loyalty each team member of the crew had for each other, it was not a surprise that all it took was a call from Dom, to have them all agreeable to convene, even though each and every one of them were living out their own exciting lives. Hence, loyalty to the cause and team, made the assemble possible again.(not to mention the pace at which it happened…)

Furious Lesson #3: Plan. Plan. Plan.

You just know that a team will do well, when they are able to gather around a table and discuss ideas and strategies. Dom had the perfect team. They had been on heist for eons, and must have understood each other so well. So why the need to plan? Cause, every challenge poses a different characteristic. In this installment, I found the crew gathering around the table more times than ever before. In fact, even the evil team,led by Shaw seemed to take planning seriously. Heck they even checked on each other’s backgrounds to find out the magnitude of their challenge. Hence, most of the actions that took place were direct results of planning. Even if some of the execution may leave much to be desired, it still does not deny the fact that, planning was crucial.

Furious Lesson #4: Delegate The Scope To The Best Suited Crew Member

Rather obvious I know, but I feel that this is a crucial lesson that ought not to be overlooked. When their cars were ripped apart. due to the rather “plain vanilla” modifications they had on their existing cars, Dom designated Tej to source out new “armor” to equip them. Tej, being the genius personified, did it without a hassle. He got the crew brand new cars, with great enhancements. In the movie, you will see great examples of how each member of the team, did what they did best. Han was the reconnaissance guy. Giselle was the weapons specialist. Dom was the typical batch-em- up guy. Brian tapped on his previous networks to get leads. Roman was the guy with abundance of energy, who kept team spirits burning with his wise ass jokes. Know your team member’s strengths and leverage on them.

Furious Lesson #5: When Execution Of A Plan Fails, Improvise

This point sticks like a sore thumb for me. Cause it resonated with my usual method of managing a team. The scene for this point came about when Shaw had a tank, blazing through the highway. All the plans, Dom’s team had were literally smashed to smithereens. Roman asked via their radio set, as to what they should do, now that they had a tank to contend with. It was Brian who coolly replied, “We do what we always do best. We improvise.” Improvise they did, cause eventually, they manage to break that tank. So yeah, improvise is a good operative word to have in your team management arsenal.  How do you improvise? You do what you need to do, to make the best out of any bad situation.

Furious Lesson #6: Live By A Code

Shaw,(the villain)highlighted a very good point, in his confrontational conversation with Dom in one of the scene. He mentioned that he knew Dom’s weakness in managing his team, was his code of treating his crew members as his family members. Shaw, however, in his admission, saw his team members as parts of a functioning juggernaut. He emphasized that his team had to carry the ethos of precision, and if one of the crew can no longer fulfill that precise function, then he was going to be deemed dispensable. You will however sense a deep mutual sense of respect, between Dom and Shaw, cause as what Shaw poignantly said, “It’s good that you (Dom) have a code, cause most men don’t…”(something along those lines). What made this point much more engaging, was that this code both team lived by, symbolically played its definition out, as eventually, all of Shaw’s men died, while Dom’s crew, enjoyed a barbecue session, like a family, at the end of it all. As a team, it is imperative, that a code or principle is laid out, as a sense of guidance for its framework of planning, execution and celebration. 

So there you have it, my take away from yet another fabulous installment of this franchise. I’d die to have a team like Dom’s. Oh well, that is a post for another day I guess! 🙂

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